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's in here. he fund out firsthand by traveling to the mississippi delta that something as simple as seeing a doctor is a major challenge. ♪ ♪ >> it is often called the birthplace of the blues in the poverty stricken delta this is a welcome distraction from the region's joblessness and spark access to healthcare. ♪ ♪ >> a lot of people that need insurance don't have it. i actually happen to be one of them. >> with the few west working family doctors per capita in the nation many in mississippi's poor and rural areas have trouble seeing a physician. the magnolia state averages 1 physician for every 1700 people. in the delta it is much worse. >> it is a hard place to live. >> in 2011 just one primary care doctor was registered in this county, home to 5,000 people. here, where hou where more than0 live, there is two. >> in delta we have areas with a lot of transportation, there is not public transportation so people have trouble getting to providers and you don't have a large number of provide res, in particularly, specialists. >> so, we're driving through the mississippi delta. if y
to coach under saints boss peyton. breeze 1 mississippi 2 mississippi 3 mississippi 4 mississippi. got all day to find a receiver and hit stills. 14 of 18 for 202 yards. 17 nothing saints. buck 24 on the money due to moore. raiders down at the half. then defense comes through. quarterback wallace hit hard by 7 round pick bass. robinson for the scoop and score but raiders fall in new orleans 28-20. cal football team open up the season in just two week against northwestern. have a true freshman taking the snap head coach dikes has named goff the starting quarterback today. 4 star recruit out of may run catholic high school. big guy. 6 foot 4 very consistent. he can thank his dad jerry for the strong am. major league pitcher never pressured his son. >> s when i was younger i raised me to play the fwaip. talk to him before the game he said have fun. i try to do. have if you please do my job and play football. >>reporter: a open up a weekend series with cleveland tonight. chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost early this evening to seattle. thi
: immigration reform. shirley barbara says that this makes good sense. the mississippi governor says it makes good economic sense as well. the governor is here to explain why republicans are embracing something that is flawed, but better than getting nothing done at all. reading what you're trying to do here, it sounded a lot like the position that president obama has. better that than nothing. is that right? >> welcome i don't know the president obama will admit that what we've got is a total failure. the worst thing we can do is nothing. because the current system will just give us more of the same. more legal immigrants. it is the equivalent of amnesty. the senate has passed a big comprehensive bill that i think advances the ball down the field from. but i think it is a long way from perfect. and republicans in the house have the opportunity to take that as a starting point and give us a really first-rate immigration reform that will get control of the borders seriously. that will surely enforce the people who have visas to come here, that we make sure that they we when they are supposed t
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
happened in the whole history of mississippi my country. me and my partner says we are people that have dignity and respected that's a what this means (clapping) and i know that mayor newsom or governer likes the word extra ordinary but the country is sending a message because lgbt community that their rights were not ongoing by now they have to pay attention. we're now going to end with marriage equality there has to be equality for all of us including our transgender brothers and sisters. we're not leaving anyone behind this is only the beginning. thank you so much let's keep fighting. (clapping) >> his leadership has been extraordinary not only in his district it's going to be the site of a tremendous celebration this evening so have fun but really citywide and really statewide seeing as a tremendous leader supervisor scott wiener (clapping). >> thank you. thank you although the voters are annoy my - i want to thank my former boss city attorney dennis herrera. i remember back almost a decade ago from the very first moment he was there for our community along with our lieutenant gov
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
hill of mississippi. you know that portion of the speech, right? at the 50-year anniversary of that moment at 3:00 p.m. tomorrow, bells are going to ring in d.c. and across the country and even apparently in places as far away as switzerland and japan. that's tomorrow afternoon. here's the other thing you need to know for tomorrow, though. even if you're not in a place where you can watch tv during the day, take a note of this for tomorrow night. this is something that never happens. tomorrow night, wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern, msnbc has moved heaven and earth to get permission to air the "i have a dream" speech uninterrupted in its entirety. you think you have heard the whole speech, but you really probably haven't. access to the tape of the speech is very, very highly restricted. it is almost impossible to get permission to play even any large piece of it, let alone the whole thing. but tomorrow here on msnbc, at 8:00 p.m., we have moved heaven and earth to be able to play "i have a dream" uninterrupted in full. you should plan to not miss it. this is not somethin
nominated me and the campaign was congressman jim mcgovern from mississippi who had been -- he and joe mokely, the late joe had been strong supporters of our work. i knew him personalfully a sense. personally as a congressperson. whenever we were having trouble, they were always there. i have a great affection for him. >> host: back to '97 when the announcement came out. were you anticipating it? >> guest: we knew we were frontrunners. that's the truth. >> host: how did you know? >> guest: we knew we had been nominated. mcgovern wasn't the only one. there was a woman from sweden, i think at the time was the head of their foreign relations committee. she nominated us. i heard later that others had as well. when we were in norway negotiating the treaty which was in september of '97 was the last phase of the negotiation. journalists started coming up to us and saying how do you feel about being a frontrunner. our response is we're not here to discuss the peace prize. >> host: here is a picture there. where is that picture? >> guest: my house in vermont. we received the call. my now husban
that will swim up, they have been known to swim up to mississippi river. most say it is the mouth of the bay. one thing you don't need to be concerned is getting attacked by a shark in chesapeake bay. there are parts of the world, chesapeake bay, they are uncommon there >> reporter: you don't need to worry about going in the bay? >> with the frequency, number of bull sharks going on, very infrequent, not going to be a problem. >> reporter: were you surprised? >> it happened in 2001. couple of fisherman, caught them, turned up at the mouth of the potomac. typically a couple every year. this is something going on. chesapeake bay is a highway of fish coming in from the ocean. they are there for food just like these sharks are coming for food. they are full of stipe bass. >> reporter: they are not hunting people? >> they are looking for fish. >> reporter: if you see one, what should you do? >> if you are at the beach and see a large shark, it would be in your best interest to go to the pool. >> reporter: i am with you. [laughter]. >> we have 16 species of sharks in the lower bay. bay is important for
, now until september 3rd. that's the power of german engineering. >>> february 25th, 1870 mississippi became the first ever african-american sworn into the united states senate. revels was elected by the mississippi state legislative the reconstruction era and was only given his seat after a heated debate among senators. "new york times" story from that day. the colored member admitted to his seat in the senate. here's how the "times" described the scene in the senate chamber that day. the ceremony was short. his demeanor was as dignified as to be expected under the circumstances. the abuse poured upon him and during his race over the last two days may have shaken the nerves of anyone. the vast throng in the gallery showed no signs of feeling one way or the other and left very quietly. >>> now, contrast that with the scene in newark this past tuesday night when cory booker came closer to joining the senate with a blowout in the democratic primary. >> it is such an honor to be your nominee, to be your democratic nominee for the united states senate. thank you! >> here's the thing. betw
-- guest: the idea is that each state is supposed to have one. it is problematic in some seo --mississippi, in some oun -- some states and counties, there may only be one. there are multistate plans, which we haven't mentioned before. the people who designed the law and who wrote it foresaw the chance that in some parts of the country there might not be sufficient competition. there are provisions to have at least one nonprofit of the state plan and one for-profit of the state plan. they are still being implemented now. they are not likely to be rolled out on a national basis, as was the original intention. --t there are other backstops they are another backstop intended to bring in more competition into states that may be lacking them. another is the co-ops. the federal government, the law provided large subsidies to set up brand-new insurance companies in some states. typically these are blue states like maryland, california -- guest: they were stopped midstride. they got defunded. guest: so it won't be in every state. but the point is that there may be limits to competition and that is
on the mississippi, which was not quite as good as what mark twain portrayed in his book, but after doing that for a year, he teamed up with another american of german dissent named ben mast, and together they went to work in a flour mill in st. louis, and they did that for about a year; then they moved to illinois where they worked on a farm for three years, and in 185 p -- 1853 after hearing the great stories about the gold rush in california, they decided to make the move west, and they did this by buying 200 head of livestock driving them from st. louis to california, and turns out that could be a profitable venture things even back then were more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or ox for five or ten dollars in st. louis, and the same animal cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada in 1853, and they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years working gold, operating a sleuth box for mixed results. some days very profitabl
at the forecast rainfall across the region, across the mississippi river valley and lower ohio valley we could see the potential for heavy rain, special across arkansas an in towards tennessee where we could see 6-12 inches in a very short period of time. still hot, still summertime across the southern plains. 98 in dallas, 98 in shreveport. 98 in houston, what it feels like, it's oppressive. 103 t in houston, 102 in san antonio. they are used this kind of weather. dallas, your forecast average right now is 97 degrees. another day of hundred degree heat and then we'll be slightly below average with some thunderstorms in the forecast. >> gregg: it's beautiful here in new york. it's unbelievable. it's in the 80s. >> spectacular with hardly any humidity. one of those days, we should have called in sick. >> gregg: it's jammed outside on sixth avenue. dominican day parade. great day for it. thanks very much. >> heather: in indonesia meantime, crews are searching for two children after a volcanic eruption, at least six people were killed when lava flowed into a village. the head of disaster agency they
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
's go down to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like this mor >>> thanks, bill. 8:07 now. taking a live look at the golden gate bridge, what you can make out here. i can tell you right now the low clouds are going to be with us for most of the daylplp in san francisco, but you will get gel a couple of bits ofÑi sunshine. most comfortable conditions right around the innerq xdbay. 75 for instance in oakland. then the heshu is on as we head through tomorrow climbing by 90s return wednesday. upper 90ed by >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while
in mississippi. an instructor and student made a jump saturday and disappeared. they were found hours later in a remote swamp. >>> a new picture of n.s.a. leaker edward snowden leaving russia. he was granted temporary asylum and is leaving with other ex-patriots. this while president obama says he will not meet with russian president putin for a one on one unless the situation changes. thoeup -- >>tucker: a scene out of a cops and robber movies. swat members stormed an animal shelter to shoot and kill gill -- giggles. >>steve: was it necessary to kill giggles or is this an example of excessive force in a government gone wild? ray shelby was taking care of giggles and witnessed the incident. he joins us live from chicago. good morning to you. >> good morning. >>steve: why did you have this white-tailed deer at the shelter? apparently you do need to have permits. otherwise it's illegal to keep him. >> a family from illinois brought the deer up because they were -- the deer had been in their backyard for like three days, and they didn't see the mother, so they knew we were there. the shelter i
today in louisiana. i got that. >> it is only mississippi, alabama, three states. >> i said that. >> seriously. i think before -- you have never done that? >> i think the panhandle went all the way to louisiana. he was technically maps. if you look at the maps of your late 18th century map maker. >> i think he is tired. >> there are many other states that embrace those conservative values, the approach that we have taken over the years. i am in one today in florida. you look at south carolina. you look at florida -- >> we're in louisiana. >> i know and i said that. i am in one of those states that reflect those today in louisiana. >> we are here. how great is he? >> i want him to run. >> he just might. >> howard stern. >> i would have been scared to do this interview. >> he was good. judge of "america's got talent" they are across the street at radio city music hall. i asked why he wanted to take the gig. >> i took it because i thought it was fun. i was a viewer of the show. i would judge from my bedroom and would go on the air and say i should be a judge on these shows. i will t
. louisiana, mississippi, what is happening in some of those states? >> that is an important point, one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. the expert we will hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have gone to the south, other than -- shunned the south, other than texas. that has been a problem. now, you are seeing dixie really attracting a lot of the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states with the biggest percentage increase of immigration over the last 15 years has been georgia. it has become a high-growth state. people at, are immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits, or are they attracted to a state that has jobs? we look at some of the evidence, and what we found was, on balance, immigrants are much more likely to go to states with unemployment rates than they are to go to states with welfare. they are coming here because they want a job, not a welfare check. >> it makes logical sense. if you are to leave your country and make out somewhere new -- >> there are so many people on the other side of the
appendectomy at a hospital in jackson, mississippi. the 71-year-old is expected to make a full recovery. >>anna: 32 minutes after the hour. how do you stop government leaks? get rid of the humans. a new dramatic step that is just being announced by the n.s.a. director at its cyber security conference. the plan, replace computer system administrators with machines. >> what we are in the process of doing, but not fast enough, is reducing our system administrators by about 90% for the first reason, which was to make our networks more defensible and more secure. >>anna: this plan was apparently already in place before the leaks but is now being sped up. >>peter: overnight a wild police chase ends with a suspect's car crashing and flipping over. take a look with us. >> you're going to have to make a turn here. look at this. off to the dirt and through the fence and rolling. >>peter: it happened in california. the man behind the wheel accused of carjacking that kia van. after about 20 minutes he finally got out of the car with a few bumps and bruises and then surrendered to police. any choice? i don'
of your competitors are holding strong. host: gulfport, mississippi, steve on our republican line. caller: i just wanted to make a couple of comments. one, i'm happy that the department of justice is trying to keep this merger from occurring. but the biggest problem that the airline industry has is that they have terrible, horrible customer service. they ou pay for a ticket, do not guarantee the plane will take off on time, they don't guarantee the plane will arrive on time, and if you happen to be landing in an airport where you have to switch from one airplane to another airplane, they don't even guarantee that they'll land on time and give you now time to get to the second departure or second leg of your trip on to your destination. the biggest problem the airline industry has is a total lack of customer service or customer concern, and that is why there aren't as many people flying as there should be, and that is why they are now charging for things like a bag, ok, if you bring a bag with you, they now charge you for that, and they're nick and he will diming everybody to death, if you
.s. in the military yesterday. mississippi, democratic caller. your message to congress? take healtheed to care way from congress. they are making $70 per hour and they will not even raise the minimum wage. most of america are too stupid to realize they're voting against their own interests by not voting health care for themselves. have a nice day. host: sue, your message to congress? caller: i want to be at your health care plan, congress. host: what do you think should be done about the health care law? host: if they vote it in for us, they should be under the same health care. host: do you think should be defunded? caller: yes, i do. host: have you send that message to a member of congress? caller: i have not. host of the to attend a town hall meeting? caller: yes, i have. --t: who is did you go to whose did you go to? caller: ron paul. host: when was that? m, when he was running last time? host: thank you. next caller. caller tell my message to them is -- caller: my message to them is that obama care is coming in with -- medicare was here before obama care. if we take money at of this out of th
is the critical year. realignment wouldn't have happened if not for the 1930s -- >> -- got 87% in mississippi -- >> and eisenhower got a stronger share of the southern vote. >> we could talk about it off camera. listen, "the national review" cover story, "why like ike." thank you very much. cokie, thank you, have a great weekend. tomorrow, david axelrod will be here on set and we'll talk to reverend al sharpton and martin luther king iii ahead of the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. ahead this morning, the official director of the consumer financial protection bureau. it's official, richard cordray in his first television interview since his confirmation. the incredible 911 call from that school shooting outside of atlanta. how a level headed school employee may have single-handedly prevented tragedy. when we come back. the secret is out. hydration is in. [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. >>> good morning, everybody. 8:00 a
was in the march. i was in the mississippi delta when i got a call from friends who say bayard said if you want to work on the march, it's going to happen. get yourself on to a plane and come to new york. and that's how i got to be on the staff of the march. one of the seminole experiences of my lich. >> 50 years ago today. we'll return to today's commemoration of the march later in the show. >>> president obama to do something about the horrifying carnage in syria. anything he can do? a live report is next. can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. yo
in remote, western kentucky. it's right near the mississippi river in that little part of kentucky that abuts missouri and it's in a town of like 400 people and the candidates come and just the audience heckles them and things get thrown on the stage. i found a story from 1995 and two candidates from secretary of state in kk centucky. his father chants fbi, fbi during a speech. almost a fight, they had to hold him back. that's what's going on in coycoid tco kentucky today. i wonder, rick, we talk about mitch mcconnell last segment. what are kentucky voters going to be see from mitch mcconnell over the next year? >> people underestimate him because he has a soft kind of effect and this guy is not going to play a round and he's not going to take any -- there's not going to be any slack for either allison grimes or his republican opponent. this is a guy who goes for the throat and he's not going to screw around and i think you're going to see he has three things going for him. he has resources and he'll spend them, he'll spend them early, that works. an early understanding of the stat
southern strategy, of ronald reagan's infamous trip to philadelphia, mississippi, now to the dismantling of the voting rights act and restricting voting laws we're seeing. is it disappointing that republicans weren't part of the march on washington anniversary? of course it was. but is it a surprise? not really. it's the story of the last 50 years. real football fans love a good snowball. if you are the governor of the state hosting the first outdoor cold weather super bowl ever, are you really supposed to say that's what you are hoping for? we'll tackle that next. we believe it can be the most valuable real estate on earth. ♪ that's why we designed the subaru forester from the back seat forward. the intelligently designed, responsibly built, completely restyled subaru forester. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. and this park is the inside of your body. you see the special psyllium fiber in metamucil actually gels to trap and remove some waste. and that gelling also helps to lower some cholesterol. it even traps some carbs to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels as part of
the panhandle area and down into mississippi and alabama too. but we have some changes coming to the southeast. got to get through the next couple of days and high pressure building in beyond that. and dry weather. the sunshine returning to a good chunk of the south. monday looks phenomenal. just a heads up planning ahead, monday is your day, right across to the southeast. storms will continue in florida. the forecast for temperatures, summer-like weather returns to the upper midwest. temperatures warming back up mid to upper 90s through the weekend. minneapolis, for you, chicago, upper 80s and close to 90 yet again. our wildfire story continues in the west. it is hot, dry, more than 50 fires burning across the west and a number of them continuing to be below the 50% containment. in particular, watching the beaver creek fire. this one in idaho. we'll have more favorable weather conditions. temperatures in the mid-80s. today, tomorrow, a chance for showers and thunderstorms. shifting winds with these storms. and dry lightning could always be a concern for sparking additional fire burned at fire
't mississippi and it wasn't alabama and you can see that even today, certainly there were racial and ethnic tensions but they were not so universal that interracial cooperation was rendered impossible. >> the belief is fading that answers can be found and we're losing the will to search for it. >> reporter: the war effort ended, the car business slowed. factories left for the suburbs and other states. sprawling neighborhoods began to empty. it was to the long before the hundreds of to you sands of people who transformed this city were suddenly nowhere to be found. >> so where do we go from here? how did we get here? we're going to look at that but also as we were driving in yesterday, noticed all the blithed buildings, so much work to be done in this city, but also so many positive things happening and so many beautiful aspects of this city's legacy that we're going to be talking about this morning straight ahead. >> mike, this has been happening slowly. you know, you can see it when you came here in the '70s. remember 1980 i think it was, they had the super bowl here. my god, that was 30 s
on into the upper mississippi river valley. sunny and hot from the gulf coast to the northwest. rain leftover in new england. saturday, kind of wet through the ohio river valley back into the plains. west coast looking fabulous again. sizzling in texas. sunday, sunday, more rain in the mid-atlantic states. the heat continues out west. and a few >>> 9:33. we do havess an overcast sky ov the bay bridge but the golden gate completely clear. show you san jose. a nice, hazy sky here, lots of blue overhead. we have a beautiful day shaping up. the wind is the reason why. even though we have got a nice clear sky in san jose, that cool ocean air is going to continue to move all the way inland. keep our temperatures really comfortable. that means we are expecting 80 inland, 72, bay side, 63 at the coast, today, finally warm up to seasonal averages. >> that's your latest weather. carson? >> i'm going to build something now. thank you, al. >>> are you a weekend warrior who loves to take on new projects? is we've got cool ideas for you that should help you spruce up your home. >> kevin o'connor of this old house
in the south like louisiana, mississippi. you know, what's happening in some of those states in terms of -- is that helping or hurting? >> that's a really important point. this is kind of one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. richard vedder is the expert on this who you'll hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have shunned the south other than texas. in fact, that's been a problem for growth in the south for a hundred, since the end of the civil war. now you're seeing dixie attracting the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states that has had the biggest percentage increase in immigration over last 15 years has been georgia. and georgia actually has become a high growth state. and this gets to the point people ask are immigrants more attracted to a state that has high welfare went fits -- benefits or to a state that has jobs. and so we rooked at some of -- we looked at some of this evidence, and what we found was on balance immigrants are much more likely to go to states with low unemployment rates than they are to go to the s
can do how can we serve and then power them. in 1963 in jackson, mississippi, angry protesters and armed police prevented any massacre after the murder of edgar evans. that was a kind of lawyer and later that he was. years later he gave me his photo with a description from tennyson's eula says. .. and particularly the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] hillary clinton wrapping up her remarkings in san francisco. we are going to take you live with the national prez club and a discussion underway a minute ago on the role of government affairs officers and whether they help or hinder government transparency. live coverage on c-span2. >> the panelist presentations will be available on paoand reporters pao in public affairs officers and a and d reporters at blog spot. com. as a reporter i should disclose that i'm biased in favor of as much openness and disclosure as possible and as few rules as possible about who can talk to reporters in the federal government, and how. but i also recognize and i really mean this. the public affairs has an indispensable j
. this is in mississippi. the incredible architecture led the recovery effort, and what he did was didn't say we're rebuilding your community, but we're coming in to rebuild with your community, and that rebuilding center is now an economic development center. is us in a nutshell; right? this is when people ask what do architects do? this is us. the reality is that it's value. i'm going to go through a bunch of projects quickly to talk value. what value do we bring? the value of safety, anyone in a tough neighborhood understands what safety and security and security brings. here we are. the roughest neighborhood in south africa with the highest instance of violence murder, rapes, and violence crime. ddpu, rather than saying, hey, we want to do a do-good project, but -- put it by the highways. there's a tactical approach of urban planning, seeing where the areas were, and that's where we go, doing urban a.q. puncture -- acupuncture. we ended up in a park that has -- basically a park where women were raped, murdered, and dumped for decades, and it was across the street from the school. that's one
firsthand by traveling to the mississippi delta that something as simple challenge. ♪ ♪ keep your boom boom boom like nobody do ♪ ♪ keep your boom boom boom like nobody do ♪ >> it is often called the birthplace of the blues. these swing sounds are a welcome distraction from the region's joblessness and sparse access to health care. >> a lot of people who need insurance don't have it. i had to be one of them. >> with the fewest working family doctors per capita in the nation, many of these areas have trouble seeing a physician. they average one primary care physician forever 1700 people, worse. >> it's a hard place to live. >> in 2011, just one primary care doctor was registered in sharky county. in humphry's county where more than 9,000 people live, there were two doctors. >> there is not public transportation so people have trouble getting to providers, and you don't have a large number of providers, in particular specialists. >> so we're driving through the mississippi delta right now, and if you look around you can get a sense of how rural this place is. access to care and prime th
assassinations the whole climate faugh -- it was not here because she was beaten in mississippi. the shares sold the black inmate , either we be hurt horribly you. so 200 demonstrations around the country. a public accommodation bill. the right to vote. chicago fair housing. the poor people's campaign to end the war in vietnam. now that made the case. we took poverty from 32 percent down to 12 from under lyndon johnson. by the way, drained his pain that johnson had more background and civil rights. only to become the most prolific solarized legislator in the history of our country. only lincoln compares with lyndon johnson. lyndon johnson was 64. the voting rights act of 65, day care, child care, workers' feeding program, appellation, original counsel, all of that is lbj. too seldom mentioned that major conventions of democrats today. no democratic record matches that of lyndon baines johnson. now, i would make this appeal, and i do close, one is that the speech was always around this day. the high moment of the dream and the low moment of memphis. and in the last staff meeting it went something
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